Rose Care Info

 

Rose Care Info

To prolong bloom life, you need follow only a few simple steps during the cutting and “keeping” process. These methods will allow you to keep your roses in good shape for a reasonable length of time.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could cut a huge bouquet of roses from our garden and they could last for several weeks? And don’t you wish those gorgeous bouquets that our loved ones give us could last more than just a few days? That’s not just wishful thinking, because there are a number of ways to extend the vase life of our cut roses for more than just a few days.

 

Sanitation of the Vase & Water

Let’s begin with sanitation. This is one of the most overlooked requirements for keeping your cut flowers fresh for extended periods of time. Start with a clean vase. Not just one that has been rinsed out, but a vase that has been thoroughly washed with hot, soapy water. Scrub your vases with a bottle brush to eliminate all the residue that builds up inside. Then soak them in a 5% dilution of bleach for a few minutes (about one cup per gallon of water). I sometimes run my vases through the dishwasher using very hot, soapy water, followed by a hot water rinse. Vases that have been used over and over without cleaning will accumulate bacteria that stand ready to attack and deteriorate your freshly cut roses. The cutters you use to cut your roses should also be cleaned often. Wipe down the cutter blades with a solution of bleach or alcohol.

 

Water Your Roses Before Cutting:

If cutting roses from your own garden, the night before you plan to cut your roses, water your roses well. The plants will drink up the water, which will give more substance and holding power to the cut flowers. As I water my roses, I make a mental note of the perfect blooms that I will be cutting the next morning. Sometimes, after I am finished watering, I will jot down on a notepad the names and locations of the roses to be cut. That way, I can quickly go out in the morning and cut my roses and refrigerate them before I leave for work.

 

The Best Time of Day to Cut Your Roses:

I prefer to cut my roses between the hours of 8:00 and 10:00 A.M., and sometimes I will cut them as early as 6:00 A.M. if there is enough daylight at that time of year. The hotter the weather, the earlier I will cut my roses. I believe that the blooms are the freshest at this time of day, especially if I have watered them well the evening before. However, if you have a lot of morning dew where you live, you may need to cut your roses later in the day, or after the dew has dried. I rarely cut my roses at midday as they have the least amount of substance at that time. Some people claim that cutting roses in late afternoon is preferred because supposedly the sugar content of the rose is higher at that time. Does the sugar content disappear overnight? I’ve never seen or read any scientific proof of this theory. I do know that my roses are limp from lack of substance in the afternoon, and they have excellent substance in the morning. So that’s why I cut my roses in the morning.

 

The Weather Factor

We have no control over weather, but cut roses will last much longer during cooler weather, and will deteriorate faster in hotter weather. If the weather is cool enough, sometimes you will be able to cut roses throughout the day

 

Degree of Openness of the Flowers:

The degree of openness at which you cut your roses will depend on how you intend to use them. If intended for a bouquet in the home, your cut roses will last longer if you cut them just beyond the bud stage with the petals just starting to unfurl Another factor to consider is how many petals a particular variety has. Roses with many petals can be cut at a more open stage, while a rose with fewer petals will need to be cut tighter. For example, and St. Patrick have many petals, and Silverado has fewer petals.

 

Cut & Re-cut the Rose Stems:

Use sharp, clean cutters, and cut the rose stems at an angle so that they do not sit flat on the bottom of the vase, which could impede water uptake. Promptly put the cut flowers and roses in a bucket of lukewarm water. Then, re-cut the rose stems under the water to eliminate air bubbles, which can decrease flower life and promote premature wilting of the rose bloom. If your roses will be used in a bouquet, remove the foliage below the water line to help prevent bacteria.

 

Condition & Refrigerate Your Bouquets:

Next, condition your roses by letting them drink up the warm water in a cool, dark room for about an hour. Fill the bucket full of water so that most of the stem is under water, but don’t let the bloom get wet. Then, refrigerate your roses at about 38 degrees for at least two hours or until you are ready to use them. If you have made a bouquet for the home, or if you have received a bouquet from the florist, and have the space in your refrigerator, your bouquet will last much longer if you put it in the refrigerator at night while you are sleeping.

 

Select Long-lasting Rose Varieties:

Florist roses are bred to last a long time in a vase. So, it stands to reason that some of the roses we grow in our gardens will last a long time after being cut, while others will have an extremely short vase life. You will have to experiment and do some testing, but after awhile you will know which of your roses are longer lasting. In general, antique roses do not last as long as hybrid teas. Roses such as Crystalline, Secret, and Red Intuition, were originally florist roses, so they have a long vase life. Some roses such as St. Patrick, Veteran’s Honor, Black Magic, Andrea Stelzer, Louise Estes, Moonstone, and Elizabeth Taylor have proven to last extremely long as cut flowers.

 

Floral Preservatives:

Floral preservatives extend the life of cut roses and flowers. Floralife, is a good powdered product for adding to the vase water of arrangements and bouquets. Chrysal is a different type of preservative that is used for keeping cut roses stored under refrigeration for several days before making bouquets.

 

Change the Vase Water Often:

And, finally, change the vase water of your bouquets often. Every day if you can, because old water contains bacteria, and fresh water will help to extend the life of your cut roses. Never use softened water, because it may contain salt, which is not good for your cut roses. It also helps to re-cut the stems of your roses under water every day with a sharp pair of cutters.

 

Maximize Your Cut Roses:

If you follow the suggestions given here, you can be sure to get the most out of your cut roses and floral bouquets. You can have a bouquet of roses to enjoy for a full week.

Extensive postharvest research by Dr. Terril Nell of the University of Florida at Gainesville and Dr. Michael Reid of the University of California at Davis have identified the proper care-and-handling guidelines for fresh cut flowers. They found that the critical conditions for improving quality, freshness and vase life are the 3-Cs:

 

Cooling, Cleanliness, Care. and scientific studies:

Drs. Nell and Reid have spent four years analyzing and accumulating this critical information with support from the American Floral Endowment and other trade associations. More than 500 temperature and storage shipping trials were conducted. They included tests between the University of California and the University of Florida using commercial floral transport trucks. Over 15,000 flowers were tested and documented, and more than 100,000 work hours were invested in the study. Flowers used in every aspect of the research were exposed to the same shipping practices used by the industry. Interior evaluation rooms were developed to simulate wholesale coolers, retail displays. and consumer home environments.

To the consumer, flower longevity reflects quality. Thus, long-lasting cut flowers have added value and promote repeat sales. Research has focused on three critical areas for growers to utilize and improve handling practices.

 

When to cut:

Ideally, roses should be cut in either the early morning or the late afternoon/evening. At these times, the maximum amount of plant sugars will be present in the bloom and the upper canes. Avoid cutting during the heat of the day. If possible, water the bushes heavily the day before cutting. Also, if possible, do your cutting before applying pesticide sprays, to avoid unsightly spray residues or smells.

 

How much to cut:

When “deadheading” roses in the summer, we advise cutting above the second 5-leaflet leaf, or at a point where the remaining cane is thick enough to support a new cane. When cutting a rose for a vase, you can follow the same rule of thumb, and expect to have a sufficiently long cane. Exhibitors may cut stems as long as two feet, but this is not necessary for home use. The more cane and foliage you remove from the bush, the harder the bush has to work to produce more blooms.

 

Preparing the cut rose:

There are three primary reasons why cut roses wither prematurely: 1. The formation of an air bubble or embolism in the stem, which prevents water and nutrients from going up the stem and reaching the bloom; 2. The clogging of the stem with bacterial growth, which also prevents water and nutrient circulation; and 3. The gradual depletion of the sugar stored within the stem and leaves of the cut flower.

The most important of these is the first: keeping air from getting into the cut stem. Some experts recommend taking a bucket into the garden for submerging cut flowers until bringing into the house. But air will still enter, unless the stem is recut under water. You can cut roses in the garden without a bucket at hand, but when you bring the cut roses into the house, get them into a cutting bucket as soon as possible.

Prepare a cutting bucket with hot tap water and a holding container with more hot water and a preservative. Hot water is used because it flows more easily in the plant tissue, and is able to dissipate trapped air more quickly than tepid or cold water. Submerge the bottom of the stem into the cutting bucket, and cut off, under the water, about a half inch of the stem. Cut the stem at an angle, and do not crush the stem. Hold the cut stem under the water for about ten seconds, then move it to the holding container. Keep the blooms in the holding container until the water cools to room temperature. Vase life can be further extended by placing the blooms in the holding container in the refrigerator overnight.

 

Preservatives:

The underwater cut takes care of the air problem; bacteria and nutrients can be addressed with a floral preservative. There are a number of homebrew techniques, such as citric acid, bleach, aspirin, sugar and more. However, a good commercial floral preservative such as Floralife TM, Bloomlife TM or others will do the best job for your money. Instead of buying the expensive packets of preservative, consider asking a florist to get you a bulk quantity. To further deter bacterial contamination, wash your containers, vases and tools after each session.

 

Prolonging vase life:

Once the cut roses are in a vase, there are a few other tips to prolong the bloom. Remove any thorns or foliage that will be below the top of the vase. Keep the roses in a cool, dark location as much as possible. For example, before you leave for work, move the vase out of a sunny area into a shaded part of the room. When you come home, move the vase back where you can enjoy it. Periodically change the water, recutting the stems under water, preferably daily but at least every other day.

 

How to care for your Roses:

By following these 8 simple steps you will be able to gain the maximum vase life out of your roses.

  1. Firstly use a clean vase or container and fill it with lukewarm tap water.
  2. Add some floral preservative to the water according to the directions given. You should be able to get floral food/preservative from your local florist or by contacting us. We recommend using Chrysal Clear cut flower food for optimum vase life and quality. Floral preservatives provides sugars, balances pH, and limits bacterial growth.
  3. Remove any water vials which may have been shipped with your roses. These provide only a temporary water source during delivery. However, do not remove floral wires which may have been attached to individual rose stems. These provide helpful support for some roses.
  4. Remove any foliage from the roses that will be below the waterline of the container, being careful not to scrape or cut through the green bark of the stems. Air may enter stems at such injuries, blocking water uptake. Leaves left under water will cause bacteria to develop and will significantly shorten the life of your roses.
  5. Fill a sink or wide container with several inches of warm water. While holding each stem under water, cut about 2 – 3cm (one inch) diagonally off the end with a sharp knife or shears and immediately place the roses into your water filled container. This prevents any air lock forming at the bottom of the stems, which could prevent the flower form drawing up the water.
  6. Gently remove any outermost petals which may have been bruised during shipping. Removing a few petals will not damage a blossom and will often help it open more fully.
  7. Position and display your roses in a cool spot, out of direct sunlight and any extreme temperature areas. Avoid keeping your roses near fresh fruit. Ripening fruit gives off ethylene gas which will significantly reduce the life of your roses.
  8. Check your roses daily and add more preservative and fresh water as needed. The water should be changed every 3 to 4 days and the roses recut for optimum vase life.

If your roses are delivered arranged in florist foam or other filler material, add water immediately but slowly to properly saturate the material. Check the foam and add water daily in order to keep the foam saturated.

If your roses remain tight and are not blooming, or you would like to accelerate the blooming process, recut the roses as described above and place them into hot (not boiling) water. You may also place a paper or plastic bag over the roses for an hour or two to encourage the roses to bloom.

 

Premature Wilting

If your roses begin to wilt within a day or two of receiving them, it may be an indication that there is air trapped in the stem. This air is preventing preservative solution form moving up the flower. There may also be a scrape or cut in the bark above the water level.

Re-cut the stem an inch or so from the bottom or above any damaged area of the stem. Submerge the entire rose in a basin of warm to hot water (about 50-60 degrees C). It should usually revive within an hour or so and can be replaced in the arrangement.

 

Flower Arrangements:

IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL, check water level. Add warm water (100 deg F/38 deg C) with floral preservative if needed. Keep vase full by adding water with floral preservative daily. If arranging foam is used, make sure it is always thoroughly saturated. DISPLAY in a cool location out of direct sunlight. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. TO REARRANGE, re-cut stem ends under water, using sharp scissors or knife. Use a clean container with warm water containing floral preservative.

IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL, remove foliage which will be below the water line in your arrangement. Re-cut stems under water with sharp scissors or knife. TO ARRANGE, use clean vase. Keep vase full by adding water with floral preservative. If arrangement foam is used, saturate it thoroughly in warm water with floral preservative. Insert stems firmly. DISPLAY in a cool location, out of direct sunlight. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Use a floral preservative, re-cut stems under water before rearranging.

 

Rose Arrangements:

IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL, check water level. Add warm water (100 deg F/38 deg C) with floral preservative if needed. Keep vase full by adding water with floral preservative daily. If arranging foam is used, make sure it is always thoroughly saturated. DISPLAY roses in a cool location out of direct sunlight. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. IF A ROSE WILTS, submerge entire flower and stem in tub or tray of warm water (100 deg F/38 deg C) and straighten. Cut 2″ from end of stem under water. Allow rose about 2 hours under water to revive. Another option: float the bloom in a bowl. TO REARRANGE, re-cut stem ends under water, using sharp scissors or knife. Use a clean container with warm water containing floral preservative. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Re-cut stem ends under water. Keep vase full of water; use floral preservative; display in cool area.


Important Information:

Water movement up the stem is critical to the quality and lasting characteristics of fresh flowers. If stems are not cut under water, air might get into the stem and block the ability of water to flow up the stem. By cutting stems under water and placing freshly cut flowers directly into a preservative solution, the end of the stem is sealed with water and air is not permitted to get in the way and clog the stem cells. When stems are cut under water, water is retained on the end of the stem while the stems are placed in the preservative solution.

 

Green Plants:

Select location with moderately bright light. Protect from direct sun in summer, place near sunny window in winter. Moderately moist soil is preferred. Water thoroughly only after soil is dry to the touch. Avoid overwatering; do not allow plants to stand in water. Drain excess water in saucer at base of pot to prevent root rot and protect furniture. Tropical green plants prefer temperatures that are warm: 70-72 deg F (21-22 deg C) daytimes and 65-70 deg F (18-21 deg C) nights. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. Fertilize periodically, following manufacturer’s directions. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Provide good light and avoid water-logged soil.

 

Gardens:

Moderately bright light is preferred. Protect from direct sun in summer; place near sunny window in winter. Moderately moist soil is preferred. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Avoid overwatering; do not allow plants to stand in water. Tropical green plants prefer temperatures that are warm: 70-72 deg F (21-22 deg C) daytimes and 65-70 deg F (18-21 deg C) nights. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. Fertilize periodically, following manufacturer’s directions. SPECIAL NOTE: If fresh flowers have been added to your dish garden in water-holding tubes, keep these tubes filled with water so the flowers will stay fresh as long as possible. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Provide good light and avoid water-logged soil.

 

European Gardens:

Moderately bright light is preferred. Protect from direct sun in summer; place near sunny window in winter. Moderately moist soil is preferred. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Avoid overwatering; do not allow plants to stand in water. SPECIAL NOTE: Some plants in this garden may be in individual pots, which have been placed together in the container. Check for excess water in container liner at base of pots; drain excess water to prevent root rot and protect furniture. Moderate temperatures are ideal: 65-70 deg F (18-21 deg C) daytimes and 60-65 deg F (15-18 deg C) nights. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. Fertilize periodically, following manufacturer’s directions. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Plants may dry out faster in individual pots. Check often and water as necessary for proper growth.

 

Hanging Plants:

Moderately bright light is usually preferred by most green plants used in planters. Place near a sunny window protected from direct sun. Moderately moist soil is preferred. Water thoroughly when soil surface feels dry to the touch. Avoid overwatering or allowing plants to stand in water. Non-draining containers require less frequent watering than those with drainage saucers. Because air circulates around hanging planters, the moisture is used up faster (especially outdoors). Check soil daily. Moderate temperatures are ideal: 65-70 deg F (18-21 deg C) daytimes and 60-65 deg F (15-18 deg C) nights. Avoid excessively hot or cold areas. Fertilize periodically, following manufacturer’s directions. KEY TIPS FOR SUCCESS: Remove growing points (1/2″ to 1″) of branching plants periodically to stimulate bushy and compact growth. Check soil moisture regularly, particularly outdoors

 

Rose Care For Arranged Roses:

1. Upon arrival make certain that the water level in the vase is full.

2. Check and Replenish Water Daily.

3. Always use floral preservative mixed with clean tap water (Never use water from a water softener). If you would like a complimentary package of flower preservative please e-mail info@rosefarm.com

4. If water level ever falls below the bottom of a stem, immediately re-cut approximately one inch with a sharp knife under water.

Rose Arrangement Never Do’s:

1. Put arranged roses or flowers on top of a television

2. Locate in direct sunlight

3. Under direct spotlights (where you can feel heat)

4. Locate by a drafty door

5. Locate in front of heating or air conditioner outlets

 

 

Caring for Boxed Roses (Out of Water Delivery)

  1. Boxed roses should be delivered and processed ASAP! Many boxed roses quality problems stem from not being properly arranged in a prompt manner (i.e. the man who purchased roses at noon, left them in car and gave to wife in evening when the temperature was 22 degrees or the lady who left her delivered boxed roses out of water till she returned home at 10PM.)
  2. People need oxygen roses need water!
  3. Always use a clean vase, (How Clean? You should feel comfortable drinking from it! TaraFlorist.com suggests washing all floral vases in a dishwasher.) Flowers like people, dislike bacteria.
  4. Fill vase with tap or distilled water mixed with floral preservative solution. While holding the stems under water in a sink or under running water, cut about an inch off each stem with a sharp knife. Quickly insert the rose in the prepared vase of preservative solution.
  5. Always minimize the amount of foliage that is under water level to reduce bacteria levels.

 

Rose Arrangement Never Do’s

  1. Put arranged roses or flowers on top of a television
  2. Locate in direct sunlight
  3. Put under direct spotlights (where you can feel heat)
  4. Locate by a drafty door
  5. Locate in front of heating or air conditioner outlets

 

Premature Wilting?

  • Premature wilting (within a day or two of receiving or arranging) may indicate air trapped in the stem that is preventing water and nutrients from moving up stem to the Rose bud.
  • To revive the rose, re-cut the stem an inch or so from the bottom or above any damaged area of the stem, and then submerge the entire rose in a pan of warm water (90-105 degrees Fahrenheit). Be sure the stem is straight and that the end of the stem stays below water level. It should revive within an hour or so and can be replaced in the arrangement.

 

Care & Handling of dry packed roses, needs to be panned ahead

 

  1. Location: do not process flowers close to air vents, next to fruit (ethylene) or in freezing temperatures.
  2. Clean the cooler (keep temperature of the cooler around 34-36 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity around 90%)
  3. Clean and disinfect containers (use bleach and a scrub brush)
  4. Fill containers with clean water and preservative
  5. Use proper water temperature (if water is too warm (above 110 Fahrenheit) during conditioning, roses may open prematurely)
  6. Clean and sharpen tools (do not use scissors, they tend to mash the stems)

 

Upon arrival:

  1. Cut – don’t pull! – sleeves and bands from flowers. Pulling may damage them.
  2. Do not unpack more flowers than you can process within 30 minutes. Flowers should not be left on tables or in boxes at room temperature.
  3. Place unopened boxes in a floral cooler. Prevent bottom of box from getting wet by placing boxes on pallet.

 

Processing:

  1. After receiving the roses, remove some of the leaves on the lower part of the stem, but make sure that you do not remove any of the plastic or paper around the rosebuds! Remove foliage and thorns that will be below the water line. It is not recommended to remove more than 1/3 of the foliage, however. Leaves are needed to help “pump” water up the stem. Use extreme caution while de-thorning the roses: leaf and stem wounds allow air bubbles to enter the stem which impede water uptake.
  2. Cut the stems at an angle at least ½ – 1 inch. Cut the stems under water, in order to prevent air bubbles from sealing off the stem (it only takes a second for a rose stem to dry out!). Re-cut stems under water every two or three days. This will prevent wilting or bent necks.
  3. Let the roses hydrate (“drink”) outside the cooler (condition at room temperature to increase water intake) for 1 ½ hour and for at least another six hours (some people recommend up to 12 hours!) inside the cooler.

 

Additional tips and comments:

  1. Continue to change water regularly (every two or three days)
  2. Inform your customers of “at-home” care procedures
  • o keep flowers away from a spot that is too hot (bright sunlight), cold or drafty.
  • o re-cut stems under water and every two or three days
  • o include preservative package with every purchase
  • o after leaving your shop: ask the customer to limit the time the flowers are kept in the car
  1. we do not recommend that you wire the roses because it will not improve the performance
  2. In order to increase water intake, it is preferred to avoid floral foam. If you are designing roses in floral foam, soak foam thoroughly in a preservative solution. Never adjust the height of flowers in foam.
  3. If foliage seems dry, mist the foliage lightly, but do not mist the blooms. Water droplets are breeding grounds for fungus, also know as Botrytis.
  4. While processing the roses, you may come across some roses with spots on the outside two guard petals. Do not panic: these petals have purposely not been removed at the farm in order to protect the rose from any shipping damage. Also, in case you come across any black edging, do not panic: this is Mother Nature (caused by cold days at the farm during the growing process) and it is not an indication of poor quality.
  5. Processing the flowers any different from described above (for instance: using and selling the roses immediately upon receiving) may result in quality problems. This would be beyond our responsibility and risk.
  6. Tip: increase consumer interest in colored varieties with a special promotion on a multi-color arrangement.

 

Care & Handling of Iris. **

It is better to store Irises wet than dry. Iris is ethylene-sensitive. Avoid ethylene sources. If you mix Iris with Daffodils in arrangements, first treat Daffodils properly. Soak floral foam in flower food solution before design work.

** Care & Handling of Daffodils. **

Daffodils are ethylene-sensitive. Avoid ethylene sources. Daffodils secrete a stem-clogging sap that can damage other flowers if not properly handled. Wait at least six hours before mixing with other flowers: do NOT re-cut them; the sap will be released again.

** Care & Handling of Anemones. **

Store them vertically in plenty of water with heads bent toward the light. Do not arrange them with Daffodils unless Daffodils have been treated properly.

** Care & Handling of Ranunculus. **

To prevent bending, store flowers upright. Ranunculus is also ethylene sensitive.

** Care & Handling of Chrysanthemums. **

Try to condition them overnight in the cooler before using them in design work.

** Care & Handling of Lilies. **

Avoid ethylene sources. To prevent pollen from staining petals (and clothing!!) remove anthers. Handle carefully, as open flowers crease easily. The top bloom usually normally does not open.

** Care & Handling of Lily of the Valley. **

Upon arrival, place the stems in water and refrigerate them immediately. “Convallaria” likes fresh water and they drink a lot; they always require refrigeration to maintain freshness.

When working with Lily of the Valley, take great care not to break the stems. Try the following conditioning method: submerge the whole blossom, including the stem in water for at least one hour. Then put the flower in the refrigerator to crisp up for four to six hours. To condition Lily of the Valley just before using it in bridal bouquets, hang it upside down in the refrigerator for an hour. Water then suffuses and strengthens the top bud, which otherwise may get limp.

** Care & Handling of Stephanotis. **

On receipt, open shipping carton and inspect for any bruised or damaged blossoms. Discard these and handle usable ones with care to avoid bruising. Replace flowers in the packing material and carton, mist with water and refrigerate at 40º for up to a week.

** Care & Handling of Dendrobium. **

To retain the Dendrobium radiance for up to two weeks, follow these helpful hints:

  • Unpack the flowers immediately
  • Trim up to 1/2 ” off the stems
  • Place the flowers in a clean vase with clean water and/or a commercial floral preservative. If your Dendrobiums are wilted upon unpacking, simply submerge whole sprays for 10-15 minutes in cool tap water.

Dendrobiums are slightly sensitive to ethylene. To avoid ethylene buildup, you’ll want to ensure adequate ventilation and sanitary conditions. These tropical treasures will stay their loveliest when held in water at 50º – 55ºF. Holding Dendrobiums for more than a week at temperatures below 45ºF can cause blooms to discolor or drop.

** Care & Handling of Orchids. **

Temperature-sensitive; store at 50º – 55ºF. With the exception of Cypripediums, these Orchids should be stored with the stem secured in a water tube filled with sufficient supply of preservative solution. Avoid getting water on the petals, as this can cause spotting. Store in the shipping carton or upright in a rack, taking care not to bruise them or allow them to run against rough surfaces or other flowers. Shredded paper is useful to support and protect Orchids. Orchids are ethylene sensitive and should be stored away from sources of ethylene

www.RoseFarm.com will continue to research and update all methods of prolonging the health and care of fresh flowers!

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